August 2018

Issue 27 | Volume 7

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CONTENTS

06

ON THE COVER
Wanderlust may reflect an intense urge for self-development by experiencing the unknown, confronting unforeseen challenges, getting to know unfamiliar cultures. Wanderlust may reflect an intense urge for self-development by experiencing the unknown, confronting unforeseen challenges, getting to know unfamiliar cultures.

01

The Most Incredible Sea Cliffs In The World
Wanderlust may reflect an intense urge for self-development by experiencing the unknown and confronting unforeseen challenges.

03

My Experience At The Hidden Cove Of Kona
Wanderlust may reflect an intense urge for self-development by experiencing the unknown and confronting unforeseen challenges.

05

Our Top 10 Travel Destinations
Wanderlust may reflect an intense urge for self-development by experiencing the unknown and confronting unforeseen challenges.

In Every Issue

13

ASK THE EXPERT
Among tourists, sociologists distinguish sunlust from wanderlust as motivating forces.

14

TRAVEL GEAR
A description of what this specific section consists of would go right here.

15

PHOTOS
Among tourists, sociologists distinguish sunlust from wanderlust as motivating forces.

16

HIDDEN PLACES
Among tourists, sociologists distinguish sunlust from wanderlust as motivating forces.

17

BIG ADVENTURES
Among tourists, sociologists distinguish sunlust from wanderlust as motivating forces.

Departments

18

THE KNOW HOW
Among tourists, sociologists distinguish sunlust from wanderlust as motivating forces.

19

TRAVEL TIPS
Among tourists, sociologists distinguish sunlust from wanderlust as motivating forces.

20

SIGHTS & SOUNDS
Among tourists, sociologists distinguish sunlust from wanderlust as motivating forces.

21

ONLY THE FEW
Among tourists, sociologists distinguish sunlust from wanderlust as motivating forces.

22

TRAVEL TALK
Among tourists, sociologists distinguish sunlust from wanderlust as motivating forces.

From the Editor

The English loanword “wanderlust” was already extant in the German language dating as far back as Middle High German.

The English loanword “wanderlust” was already extant in the German language dating as far back as Middle High German. The first documented use of the term in English occurred in 1902[2] as a reflection of what was then seen as a characteristically German predilection for wandering that may be traced back to German Romanticism and the German system of apprenticeship (the journeyman), as well as the adolescent custom of the ‘Wanderbird’ seeking unity with Nature.

Jim Thiel

May 2017 Worldwide Excursion Magazine

Travel Tips For Far Off Destinations

Written by Brooks Taylor

Wanderlust may reflect an intense urge for development by experiencing the unknown, confronting unforeseen challenges, getting to know unfamiliar cultures, ways of life and behaviours or may be driven by the desire to escape and leave behind depressive feelings of guilt, and has been linked to bipolar disorder in the periodicity of the attacks.

The English loanword “wanderlust” was already extant in the German language dating as far back as Middle High German. The first documented use of the term in English occurred in 1902[2] as a reflection of what was then seen as a characteristically German predilection for wandering that may be traced back to German Romanticism and the German system of apprenticeship (the journeyman), as well as the adolescent custom of the ‘Wanderbird’ seeking unity with Nature.

Expand Full Article

Robert E. Park in the early twentieth century saw wanderlust as in opposition to the values of status and organisation, while postmodernism would by contrast see it largely as playfully empowering. Robert E. Park in the early twentieth century saw wanderlust as in opposition to the values of status and organisation, while postmodernism would by contrast see it largely as playfully empowering.

The term originates from the German words wandern (to hike) and Lust (desire). The term wandern, frequently misused as a false friend, does in fact not mean “to wander”, but “to hike.” Placing the two words together, translated: “enjoyment of hiking”, although it is commonly described as an enjoyment of strolling, roaming about or wandering.

Wanderlust may reflect an intense urge for development by experiencing the unknown, confronting unforeseen challenges, getting to know unfamiliar cultures, ways of life and behaviours or may be driven by the desire to escape and leave behind depressive feelings of guilt, and has been linked to bipolar disorder in the periodicity of the attacks.

Don’t you think it’s time to get away?

What are you waiting for?

May 2017 Worldwide Excursion Magazine

The Most Incredible Sea Cliffs In The World

Written by Michael Scott

Wanderlust may reflect an intense urge for development by experiencing the unknown, confronting unforeseen challenges, getting to know unfamiliar cultures, ways of life and behaviours or may be driven by the desire to escape and leave behind depressive feelings of guilt, and has been linked to bipolar disorder in the periodicity of the attacks.

The English loanword “wanderlust” was already extant in the German language dating as far back as Middle High German. The first documented use of the term in English occurred in 1902[2] as a reflection of what was then seen as a characteristically German predilection for wandering that may be traced back to German Romanticism and the German system of apprenticeship (the journeyman), as well as the adolescent custom of the ‘Wanderbird’ seeking unity with Nature.

Wanderlust is a strong desire for or impulse to wander or travel and explore the world.

Robert E. Park in the early twentieth century saw wanderlust as in opposition to the values of status and organisation, while postmodernism would by contrast see it largely as playfully empowering. Robert E. Park in the early twentieth century saw wanderlust as in opposition to the values of status and organisation, while postmodernism would by contrast see it largely as playfully empowering.
The term originates from the German words wandern (to hike) and Lust (desire). The term wandern, frequently misused as a false friend, does in fact not mean “to wander”, but “to hike.” Placing the two words together, translated: “enjoyment of hiking”, although it is commonly described as an enjoyment of strolling, roaming about or wandering.

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May 2017 Worldwide Excursion Magazine

The Forgotten Islands of the South Pacific

By Sam Spade

Wanderlust may reflect an intense urge for development by experiencing the unknown, confronting unforeseen challenges, getting to know unfamiliar cultures, ways of life and behaviours or may be driven by the desire to escape and leave behind depressive feelings of guilt, and has been linked to bipolar disorder in the periodicity of the attacks.

The English loanword “wanderlust” was already extant in the German language dating as far back as Middle High German. The first documented use of the term in English occurred in 1902[2] as a reflection of what was then seen as a characteristically German predilection for wandering that may be traced back to German Romanticism and the German system of apprenticeship (the journeyman), as well as the adolescent custom of the ‘Wanderbird’ seeking unity with Nature.

May 2017 Worldwide Excursion Magazine

May 2017 Worldwide Excursion Magazine

My Experience at the Majestic Hidden Cove of Kona

By Melanie Daniels

Wanderlust may reflect an intense urge for development by experiencing the unknown, confronting unforeseen challenges, getting to know unfamiliar cultures, ways of life and behaviours or may be driven by the desire to escape and leave behind depressive feelings of guilt, and has been linked to bipolar disorder in the periodicity of the attacks.

The English loanword “wanderlust” was already extant in the German language dating as far back as Middle High German. The first documented use of the term in English occurred in 1902[2] as a reflection of what was then seen as a characteristically German predilection for wandering that may be traced back to German Romanticism and the German system of apprenticeship (the journeyman), as well as the adolescent custom of the ‘Wanderbird’ seeking unity with Nature.

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May 2017 Worldwide Excursion Magazine

Our Top 10 Travel Destinations

Wanderlust may reflect an intense urge for development by experiencing the unknown, confronting unforeseen challenges, getting to know unfamiliar cultures, ways of life and behaviours or may be driven by the desire to escape and leave behind depressive feelings of guilt, and has been linked to bipolar disorder in the periodicity of the attacks.

The English loanword “wanderlust” was already extant in the German language dating as far back as Middle High German. The first documented use of the term in English occurred in 1902[2] as a reflection of what was then seen as a characteristically German predilection for wandering that may be traced back to German Romanticism and the German system of apprenticeship (the journeyman), as well as the adolescent custom of the ‘Wanderbird’ seeking unity with Nature.

May 2017 Worldwide Excursion Magazine

Q&A With Outdoor Enthusiast Annie Wilkes

Wanderlust may reflect an intense urge for self-development by experiencing the unknown, confronting unforeseen challenges, getting to know unfamiliar cultures.

Q: Wanderlust may reflect an intense urge for development by experiencing the unknown, confronting unforeseen challenges, getting to know unfamiliar cultures?

Robert E. Park in the early twentieth century saw wanderlust as in opposition to the values of status and organisation, while postmodernism would by contrast see it largely as playfully empowering. Robert E. Park in the early twentieth century saw wanderlust as in opposition to the values of status and organisation, while postmodernism would by contrast see it largely as playfully empowering.

Q: Wanderlust may reflect an intense urge for development by experiencing the unknown, confronting unforeseen challenges, getting to know unfamiliar cultures?

Robert E. Park in the early twentieth century saw wanderlust as in opposition to the values of status and organisation, while postmodernism would by contrast see it largely as playfully empowering. Robert E. Park in the early twentieth century saw wanderlust as in opposition to the values of status and organisation, while postmodernism would by contrast see it largely as playfully empowering.

May 2017 Worldwide Excursion Magazine

Q&A With World Traveler Terry Malloy

Wanderlust may reflect an intense urge for self-development by experiencing the unknown, confronting unforeseen challenges, getting to know unfamiliar cultures.

Q: Wanderlust may reflect an intense urge for development by experiencing the unknown, confronting unforeseen challenges, getting to know unfamiliar cultures?

Robert E. Park in the early twentieth century saw wanderlust as in opposition to the values of status and organisation, while postmodernism would by contrast see it largely as playfully empowering. Robert E. Park in the early twentieth century saw wanderlust as in opposition to the values of status and organisation, while postmodernism would by contrast see it largely as playfully empowering.

Q: Wanderlust may reflect an intense urge for development by experiencing the unknown, confronting unforeseen challenges, getting to know unfamiliar cultures?

Robert E. Park in the early twentieth century saw wanderlust as in opposition to the values of status and organisation, while postmodernism would by contrast see it largely as playfully empowering. Robert E. Park in the early twentieth century saw wanderlust as in opposition to the values of status and organisation, while postmodernism would by contrast see it largely as playfully empowering.

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May 2017 Worldwide Excursion Magazine

The Most Magical Place You’ve Never Seen

Wanderlust may reflect an intense urge for development by experiencing the unknown, confronting unforeseen challenges, getting to know unfamiliar cultures, ways of life and behaviours or may be driven by the desire to escape and leave behind depressive feelings of guilt, and has been linked to bipolar disorder in the periodicity of the attacks.

The English loanword “wanderlust” was already extant in the German language dating as far back as Middle High German. The first documented use of the term in English occurred in 1902[2] as a reflection of what was then seen as a characteristically German predilection for wandering that may be traced back to German Romanticism and the German system of apprenticeship (the journeyman), as well as the adolescent custom of the ‘Wanderbird’ seeking unity with Nature.

Wanderlust is a strong desire for or impulse to wander or travel and explore the world.

Robert E. Park in the early twentieth century saw wanderlust as in opposition to the values of status and organisation, while postmodernism would by contrast see it largely as playfully empowering. Robert E. Park in the early twentieth century saw wanderlust as in opposition to the values of status and organisation, while postmodernism would by contrast see it largely as playfully empowering.
The term originates from the German words wandern (to hike) and Lust (desire). The term wandern, frequently misused as a false friend, does in fact not mean “to wander”, but “to hike.” Placing the two words together, translated: “enjoyment of hiking”, although it is commonly described as an enjoyment of strolling, roaming about or wandering.

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